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coffee

Pronunciation: /ˈkɔːfi; ˈkɒfi/

Translation of coffee in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 uncountable/no numerable (beans, granules, drink) café (masculine) coffee filter filtro (masculine) de café coffee grounds poso (masculine) del café coffee mill o grinder molinillo (masculine) de café coffee spoon cucharita (feminine) or cucharilla (feminine) de café
    Example sentences
    • I usually just drink ordinary dark roast coffee, as strong as possible.
    • He drank the rest of his cup of coffee and ground out the cigarette in the ashtray.
    • Wendy's heart was pumping violently in her chest, as if she'd drunk ten cups of coffee in so many minutes.
    Example sentences
    • Despite shortages of certain items like instant coffee, sugar, and most of our milk powder, the food was lasting well.
    • The value of the raw beans contained in a jar of instant coffee may be no more than a few pennies, but the final product may be sold for over £2.
    • The gifts offered to health professionals amounted to a jar of instant coffee and some non-medical books.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (color) (color (masculine)) café (masculine) con leche
    Example sentences
    • Some give cooler hues of mushroom, putty or milky coffee.
    • In the theme of green, male colours such as cream white, light coffee, green and brown along with soft cut and cute details give a profile of romantic woman.
    • There are single, doubles, anemone-flowered forms, and an amazing choice of colour variations - from coffee through to citrus yellow.

Definition of coffee in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The current Spanish Constitution (Constitución Española) was approved in the Cortes Generales in December 1978. It describes Spain as a parliamentary monarchy, gives sovereign power to the people through universal suffrage, recognizes the plurality of religions, and transfers responsibility for defense from the armed forces to the government. The Constitution was generally well received, except in the Basque Country, whose desire for independence it did not satisfy. It is considered to have facilitated the successful transition from dictatorship to democracy.