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colored

Pronunciation: /ˈkʌlərd; ˈkʌləd/
, (British English/inglés británico) coloured

Translation of colored in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 [walls/blouse] de color
    Example sentences
    • He had blond hair and was wearing a light-coloured jacket, white trousers and black shoes.
    • The answer is that it is a light-coloured animal with black stripes.
    • It is preferable to have a white or light-coloured background.
  • 2 (non-white) [dated or offensive/anticuado u ofensivo] de color [often offensive/puede resultar ofensivo]; (in S Africa) mulato, mestizo
    Example sentences
    • Never again may white South Africans forget their coloured brothers and sisters, leaving them behind.
    • The only time I ever saw him lose his temper was when a white beach official at St James yanked a small coloured boy out of the tidal pool and told him to get lost as the pool was for whites only.
  • 3 (biased) parcial
    Example sentences
    • His stories are highly coloured and immoderate, both sweet and sour.
    • His generally lush and highly coloured realisations of the instrumental continuo adds further dramatic weight.
    • Another highly colored phrase worked its way from my depths as I realized that such a mistake would not be easily repaired.

noun/nombre

  • 1
    ( also Colored)
    (non-white) [dated or offensive/anticuado u ofensivo] persona (feminine) de color [often offensive/puede resultar ofensivo]
    (Cape Colored)
    (in S Africa) mulato, (masculine, feminine), mestizo, (masculine, feminine)
  • 2
    (coloreds plural)
    ropa (feminine) de color

Definition of colored in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.