Translation of commercial in Spanish:

commercial

Pronunciation: /kəˈmɜːrʃəl; kəˈmɜːʃəl/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [relations/premises/studies] comercial commercial law derecho (masculine) mercantil or comercial
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    • A commercial agreement is between the parties concerned and should have nothing to do with what anyone else wants.
    • These people were employed by the government in the lower levels of the colonial bureaucracy and engaged in local commercial activities.
    • For example, we moved into investment banking, and when commercial banking was opened, we moved into commercial banking.
    1.2 (viable) it's not a commercial proposition no es rentable 1.3 (popular) [music/cinema] comercial
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    • However, Williams insists any decision concerning the player's future will be based on football issues rather than his commercial value.
    • Rahul is seen as a ‘serious’ actor who stars in art films rather than mainstream commercial Bollywood releases.
    • Today most of the films are having more of commercial value than quality and are packed with themes and scenes that can match the taste of youth.
    1.4 (unrefined) sin refinar
    More example sentences
    • In its most broad definition, Mr. James believes, to garden organically is to do so without the aid of commercial chemicals.
    • The shipping costs of both bulk chemicals and commercial formulas have been omitted.
    • An alternative to the commercial fungicide would be a mixture of baking soda and water.

noun/nombre

Definition of commercial in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.