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complexion

Pronunciation: /kəmˈplekʃən/

Translation of complexion in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (skin type) cutis (masculine); (in terms of color) tez (feminine) a good complexion un buen cutis a dark/light complexion una tez oscura/clara
    Example sentences
    • She had waist length, ebony hair and her skin complexion wasn't too pale nor too dark.
    • It is believed to help clear the complexion and give the skin a fine texture and bring out its natural glow.
    • My only worry is, I don't think orange is a colour that suits my complexion.
    1.2 (aspect) cariz (masculine) to put a different/new complexion on sth darle* otro/un nuevo cariz a algo 1.3 (nature, make-up) carácter (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • Nearly every song on A Treasury is a show-stopper, and the track selection is fine, spotlighting Drake's weighty insights and limning the various complexions of his character.
    • Pronger and Blake can change the complexion of the game just by being on the ice, and believe me, they will be on the ice a lot.
    • That, obviously, would have changed the complexion of the whole game.

Definition of complexion in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.