There are 2 translations of compress in Spanish:

compress1

vt

/kəmˈpres/
  • 1.1 (reduce) comprimir; [text] condensarto compress sth into sth it is compressed into solid blocks se comprime hasta formar bloques compactos he compressed the speech into a short article escribió un breve artículo en el que se condensaba el discurso
    More example sentences
    • They can be compressed into nine critical questions.
    More example sentences
    • Often, large files are compressed to reduce downloading time.
    • The files are automatically compressed so they're small enough to send via email.
    • Without a second thought, you'd probably compress the file and send it off.
    1.2 [Computing/Informática] comprimir

Definition of compress in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of compress in Spanish:

compress2

n

/ˈkɑːmpres; ˈkɒmpres/
  • compresa (feminine) hot/cold compress compresa caliente/fría
    More example sentences
    • Symptoms increased with warmth and were relieved partially with cold compresses.
    • If stung by a fire ant, the first recommended step is to apply a cold compress to relieve the swelling and pain.
    • She pressed the cold compress to the spot where she hit her head.

Definition of compress in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.