Translation of comrade in Spanish:

comrade

Pronunciation: /ˈkɑːmræd; ˈkɒmreɪd/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (friend, fellow member) compañero, (masculine, feminine), camarada (masculine and feminine) comrade in arms compañero, (masculine, feminine) de armas
    More example sentences
    • It is but a matter of time before many more of our fellow Army Reserve comrades-in-arms will be called to replace and augment those who have already answered the call.
    • Tattoos in the civil wars symbolized allegiance to military commanders and comrades-in-arms rather than to the local community.
    • The soldier and his comrades-in-arms moved deeper into enemy territory, encapsulated in their tank.
    1.2 (as form of address/como título de cortesía) [Politics/Política] (to man) compañero, camarada; (to woman) compañera, camarada
    More example sentences
    • The characters are old college comrades who have been there for each other through everything - or so they thought.
    • Since those heady days, the trade union has seen a sharp decline in popularity and membership as well as bitter divisions among former friends and comrades.
    • The AGM commenced with a minute's silence as a mark of respect to former members, family members and comrades who had passed away during the previous year.
    More example sentences
    • Long before the revolution, he knew what he would do with those of his socialist comrades who opposed him.
    • A very important privilege, comrades, has been taken away from you.
    • So, ignore the demands of the tax collectors and steel yourselves against the pleas of the children for new shoes, comrades.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.