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concomitant
American English: /kənˈkɑmədənt/
British English: /kənˈkɒmɪt(ə)nt/

Translation of concomitant in Spanish:

adjective

  • [formal]
    Example sentences
    • The expression of this gene is associated with concomitant changes in cysteine protease activity of the petals.
    • Romanticism and the political reforms concomitant with liberal thought changed this situation to some extent.
    • Gone is the image of haunted faces, enslaved to drug-addiction and the many vices concomitant with this curse.

noun

  • [formal]
    fenómeno (masculine) concomitante [formal]
    Example sentences
    • All this suggests that abetting globalization, and its natural concomitants of economic and political liberty, is a big part of any successful war on terrorism.
    • Evidence for the centrality of food ‘includes the facial expression, which focuses on oral expulsion and closing of the nares, and the physiological concomitants of nausea and gagging.’
    • This makes happiness and misery necessary concomitants of consciousness, and thus conscious beings are endowed with a desire for happiness.

Definition of concomitant in:

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    ESO (Educación Secundaria Obligatoria) is one of the stages of secondary education established in Spain by the LOE - Ley Orgánica de Educación (2006). It begins at twelve years of age and ends at sixteen, the age at which compulsory education ends. The old division between a technical and an academic education is not as marked in ESO, as all secondary pupils receive basic professional training.