Translation of condominium in Spanish:

condominium

Pronunciation: /ˌkɑːndəˈmɪniəm; ˌkɒndəˈmɪniəm/

noun/nombre (plural condominiums)

  • 1 (American English/inglés norteamericano) 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (ownership) régimen (masculine) de propiedad horizontal
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    • As noted in paragraph 17 above, the occupancy fee incorporates three components, namely, mortgage interest, condominium fees, and property taxes.
    • Foreigners may have freehold ownership of a condominium title, with a proportional or strata interest in common land.
    • For your parents, it would mean changing the ownership of their condominium from their individual names to the name of their revocable living trust.
    1.2 (building) condominio (masculine) (Latin America/América Latina) , bloque (masculine) de pisos (Spain/España)
    More example sentences
    • The works department estimates that multi-family dwellings - which include apartments, condominiums and townhouse complexes - are home to about 40 per cent of Toronto's population.
    • I try to think of a descriptive metaphor as we head west on Euclid Avenue, passing abandoned houses, new and gated condominiums, and apartment buildings with boards nailed to all the ground-level windows.
    • In the 1980s, new beaches were developed from reclaimed land, and luxury high-rise apartment buildings and condominiums were constructed to appeal to wealthy residents and investors.
    1.3 (apartment) apartamento (masculine), piso (masculine) (Spain/España) ([ en régimen de propiedad horizontal ])
    More example sentences
    • The proposed tower will house 104 condominiums.
    • Villas, apartments and condominiums are scattered along a delightful waterway most with their boats moored only metres away…
    • New apartments and condominiums continue to flood the market despite the generally low occupancy rates.

Definition of condominium in:

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