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consult

Pronunciation: /kənˈsʌlt/

Translation of consult in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 [expert/colleague/dictionary/watch] consultar if symptoms persist, consult a doctor si los síntomas continúan, consulte a su médico we were not consulted about the office move no se nos consultó (sobre) el traslado de la oficina
    Example sentences
    • Anyone seeking such advice should consult a competent professional.
    • Do always consult an expert for advice on international adoption agencies and orphanages.
    • Continue to engage and consult professional trainers, breeders and other specialists.
    Example sentences
    • I would not consult watches or diaries if I did not need time to do things, if I did not need to do things on time.
    • Serena watched him consult his electronic notepad then head for the door of the hotel room.
    • He had refreshed his memory by consulting the meticulous diaries he has kept throughout his career.
  • 2 (consider) [formal] [feelings/interests] tener* en consideración, considerar
    Example sentences
    • He said that at the centre of the present crisis was the fact that the federal council had taken a course of action without consulting the people.
    • No one of course consulted the Scottish people, and widespread popular opposition greeted the Union.
    • Of course I am not consulted by State-owned enterprises before they put up prices.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • they consulted and decided to leave se consultaron entre sí y decidieron irse I ought to consult with my wife first primero debería consultárselo a or consultarlo con mi mujer

Definition of consult in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.