Translation of consult in Spanish:

consult

Pronunciation: /kənˈsʌlt/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 [expert/colleague/dictionary/watch] consultar if symptoms persist, consult a doctor si los síntomas continúan, consulte a su médico we were not consulted about the office move no se nos consultó (sobre) el traslado de la oficina
    More example sentences
    • Anyone seeking such advice should consult a competent professional.
    • Do always consult an expert for advice on international adoption agencies and orphanages.
    • Continue to engage and consult professional trainers, breeders and other specialists.
    More example sentences
    • I would not consult watches or diaries if I did not need time to do things, if I did not need to do things on time.
    • Serena watched him consult his electronic notepad then head for the door of the hotel room.
    • He had refreshed his memory by consulting the meticulous diaries he has kept throughout his career.
  • 2 (consider) [formal] [feelings/interests] tener* en consideración, considerar
    More example sentences
    • He said that at the centre of the present crisis was the fact that the federal council had taken a course of action without consulting the people.
    • No one of course consulted the Scottish people, and widespread popular opposition greeted the Union.
    • Of course I am not consulted by State-owned enterprises before they put up prices.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • they consulted and decided to leave se consultaron entre sí y decidieron irse I ought to consult with my wife first primero debería consultárselo a or consultarlo con mi mujer

Definition of consult in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.