There are 2 translations of contract in Spanish:

contract1

n

/ˈkɑːntrækt; ˈkɒntrækt/
  • 1 1.1 (agreement) contrato (m); (for public works, services) contrata (f) to enter into a contract (with sb) celebrar un contrato (con algn) to honor/break a contract cumplir/incumplir or violar un contrato contract of employment contrato de trabajo under the terms of your contract según lo establecido en su contrato a fixed contract un contrato fijo to be under contract to sb/sth estar* bajo contrato con algn/algo to win/lose a contract [Business/Comercio] obtener* or conseguir*/perder* un contrato to put sth out to contract otorgar* la contrata de or para algo (before noun/delante del nombre) [price] contractual contract law derecho (masculine) contractual 1.2 (document) contrato (masculine) to sign a contract firmar or [formal] suscribir* un contrato to exchange contracts (in UK: on property deal) suscribir* el contrato de compraventa
  • 2 (for murder) [slang/argot] to put out a contract on sb ponerle* precio a la cabeza de algn (before noun/delante del nombre) contract killer asesino, (m,f) a sueldo, sicario, (m,f) contract killing asesinato (masculine) a sueldo
    More example sentences
    • When he can't succeed in killing himself, he hires a contract killer to carry out the job for him.
    • For example, a serial killer and a contract killer both kill lots of people, but the crimes are essentially different.
    • Then a solution presents itself: why not hire a contract killer?

Definition of contract in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of contract in Spanish:

contract2

vt

/kənˈtrækt/
  • 1 also /ˈkɑːntrækt; ˈkɒntrækt/ (place under contract) contratar
    More example sentences
    • If a local authority contracts a builder to construct a certain amount of houses they must pay the full cost not just a deposit.
    • Channel Seven contracted an outside lawyer to work up a draft agreement and has refused to negotiate on anything falling outside its scope.
    • He complained about the wild dogs and the National Parks & Wildlife Service contracted a local man to trap and shoot the dogs.
  • 2 2.1 [debt/liability] contraer* [formal] 2.2 [disease] contraer* [formal]
    More example sentences
    • If you think you've contracted an infectious disease, contact your doctor.
    • Two other patients are critically ill after contracting the disease through infected organs from the donor.
    • His early education was restricted by severe asthma and he contracted tuberculosis when he started medical school.
    More example sentences
    • Now with open access, the mining companies wish to handle the traffics themselves, or contract with third parties.
    • Vendors contract with one of nine independent laboratory-testing facilities.
    • He told how they contract with area farmers to guarantee a steady supply.
    More example sentences
    • I mean, it's just not on, it's not the real world, and when you contract for something you expect to pay that price, and you expect to get it on time.
    • That is, you could contract for how many calls you would receive, and what kind of calls.
    • In October 1986 the government introduced the Goods and Services Tax charged on almost everything you buy or contract for.
    More example sentences
    • At my workplace, food and housekeeping services have been contracted out to subsidiaries of Compass Group, a British multinational corporation.
    • Other courses have been contracted out to private suppliers.
    • The university proposed that current staff positions could be contracted out with four months' notice, a proposal which made the staff feel threatened.
    More example sentences
    • As stated earlier, much of the debt was contracted by undemocratic governments and oppressive regimes.
    • He says that he contracted the debt on behalf of the ruling party.
    • How unjust to do so by pillaging the church, an institution that was neither responsible for contracting the debt nor had benefited from the deficit expenditures.
  • 3 3.1 [muscle] contraer* 3.2 [word/phrase] contraer*
    More example sentences
    • I haven't checked the audio to see whether ‘is’ was contracted or not in those examples.
    • Incidentally, Hocus Pocus was itself contracted during the eighteenth century into the word ‘Hoax.’
    • The various sources consulted differ in its further evolution; some say the word was contracted further to aan't, others say an't (pronounced ahnt).

vi

/kənˈtrækt/
  • 1 also /ˈkɑːntrækt; ˈkɒntrækt/ (enter into an agreement)to contract (with sb) for sth celebrar un contrato (con algn) para algo we hope to contract with them for the supply of … esperamos celebrar un contrato con ellos para el suministro de …
  • 2 (become smaller) [metal/muscle/pupils] contraerse*
    More example sentences
    • In the case of the Sun or some similar large object, as it contracts there is a decrease in its gravitational energy because the composite matter is moving closer to the middle, and that energy has to go somewhere.
    • The deer's range later contracted to the Ural Mountains, in modern-day Russia, which separate Europe from Asia.
    • On cooling it contracts to a smaller dimension, thus reducing the area of contact and allowing oxide to form at the interface.
    More example sentences
    • This stimulation causes electrical activity in the muscle, which in turn causes the muscle to contract or tighten.
    • It increases the heart rate, makes muscles contract more forcefully and enhances the general state of alertness.
    • For example, as an individual lands from a jump, the quadriceps muscle contracts, protecting the knee.

Phrasal verbs

contract in

/ˈkɑːntrækt; ˈkɒntrækt/ verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (British English/inglés británico)
suscribirse*, darse* de alta

contract out

/ˈkɑːntrækt; ˈkɒntrækt/
verb + adverb (+ preposition + object)/verbo + adverbio (+ preposición + complemento) (withdraw) (British English/inglés británico) [Business/Comercio] darse* de baja you really can't contract out of your obligations no puedes evadirte de tus obligaciones 1.1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento [job/work] subcontratar

Definition of contract in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.