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cook

Pronunciation: /kʊk/

Translation of cook in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • cocinero, (masculine, feminine) he's a good cook cocina muy bien, es muy buen cocinero to be chief cook and bottle-washer I'm not chief cook and bottle-washer here, you know mira que yo no soy la sirvienta or (especially Latin America/especialmente América Latina) el mandadero too many cooks spoil the broth muchas manos en un plato hacen mucho garabato
    Example sentences
    • I became aware of the cooks preparing food for us, and the servers serving us, and I began to feel grateful that they were all working so that I could sit!
    • The biggest change in food television over the last five years has been the move away from showing cooks prepare food to revealing how they manage their careers and lives.
    • One of the beautiful things about this open-plan restaurant is that you can watch the cooks prepare your food as you enjoy the surroundings.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1.1 (prepare food) [person] cocinar, guisar can you cook? ¿sabes cocinar or guisar? 1.2 (become ready) [food/meal] hacerse* 1.3 (happen) [colloquial/familiar] what's cooking? ¿qué se está cociendo? [colloquial/familiar], ¿qué se está tramando? [colloquial/familiar]

Phrasal verbs

cook up

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento
[colloquial/familiar] [excuse/alibi] inventarse; [scheme] tramar

Definition of cook in:

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Sherry is produced in an area of chalky soil known as albariza lying between the towns of Puerto de Santa María, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and Jerez de la Frontera in Cádiz province. It is from Jerez that sherry takes its English name. Sherries, made from grape varieties including Palomino and Pedro Ximénez, are drunk worldwide as an aperitif, and in Spain as an accompaniment to tapas. The styles of jerez vary from the pale fino and manzanilla to the darker aromatic oloroso and amontillado.