There are 2 translations of cop in Spanish:

cop1

Pronunciation: /kɑːp; kɒp/

n

[colloquial/familiar]
  • 2 (arrest) (British English/inglés británico) [dated or hum] it's a fair cop pues sí señor, me ha agarrado or (especially Spain/especialmente España) cogido
  • 3 (good, use) (British English/inglés británico) to be not much cop no ser* nada del otro mundo or del otro jueves [colloquial/familiar], no valer* gran cosa

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Word of the day espárrago
m
asparagus …
Cultural fact of the day

Junta Autonómica is the name given to the governments of Spain's autonomous regions, with the exception of Catalonia and Valencia's Generalitat and Galicia's Xunta.

There are 2 translations of cop in Spanish:

cop2

vt (-pp-)

  • 1.1 (win) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [journalese/lenguaje periodístico], llevarse
    More example sentences
    • He copped several A-level awards, including best all round student.
    • New Park's players copped the other awards.
    • He copped the award for the Most Outstanding Academic Performance, while Jeremiah Bishop received the Principal's Spirit Award.
    1.2 (receive, get) (especially British English/especialmente inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar] he copped a whack on the head se llevó un porrazo en la cabeza [colloquial/familiar] cop (a load of) this/him/her! ¡no te lo/la pierdas! [colloquial/familiar] to cop it (British English/inglés británico) you'll cop it if they find out como se enteren, estás arreglado or te vas a llevar una buena [colloquial/familiar] 1.3 (catch, seize) (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar], agarrar, pillar [colloquial/familiar], pescar* [colloquial/familiar] cop hold of this a minute ¿me tienes esto un momento?
    More example sentences
    • If they get caught and copped, if they get nicked and weighed-off, fair enough.
    More example sentences
    • Convict captain Ricky Ponting copped one through the visor of his helmet that laid his cheek open.
    • His leader Don Bash copped a broadside from one respondent who described him as ‘a wimp.’
    • The English media thinks they're team's copping a raw deal from the Australian media this week.
    More example sentences
    • Lately he has been copping it for calling on Europe to reduce it's health standard for food products (can you believe it) in order to make it easier for developing countries to get into the market.
    • Some of the boys thought they were copping it in the press and some had difficulty with that.
    • Ray Graham copped it a lot worse than the rest of us.
    More example sentences
    • You drink yourself stupid, doing whatever self - abuse it is you want to do, because you don't really believe you're going to cop it.
    • Does this mean Mary Jane is going to cop it in the first movie?
    • However, the gang is double crossed, one of their number cops it, the gold is stolen by said double-crosser, and generally it all goes belly up for Croker and the gang.
    More example sentences
    • I really wanted to get high because I was very really stressed out, and something about having the Feds sit outside my apartment kept me from copping any drugs.
    • After copping, they may then not be able to obtain new syringes because local pharmacies and needle exchange services may be closed or far away.
    • Social Security checks, welfare checks, and food stamp pickups (food stamp trading for drugs and other items) change street activities and copping frequency.
    More example sentences
    • They get paid millions to cop an attitude and are allowed to fail to deliver the goods on the field, court, or what have you.
    • Don't like it when someone else cops the attitude you usually reserve for yourself?
    • ‘It's pretty easy,’ April says, copping an easy-going attitude and ruining any hopes of juicy controversy.
    1.4 (steal) [colloquial/familiar] afanar [slang/argot], volar* (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar]

Phrasal verbs

cop out

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
[slang/argot] rajarse [colloquial/familiar], evadirse to cop out of sth [of responsibility/task] escabullirse* de algo, sacarle* el cuerpo a algo [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of cop in:

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Word of the day espárrago
m
asparagus …
Cultural fact of the day

Junta Autonómica is the name given to the governments of Spain's autonomous regions, with the exception of Catalonia and Valencia's Generalitat and Galicia's Xunta.