Translation of coral in Spanish:

coral

Pronunciation: /ˈkɔːrəl; ˈkɒrəl/

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (substance) coral (masculine); (before noun/delante del nombre) [island] coralino, de coral; [necklace] de coral
    More example sentences
    • Police said seven tourist boats sail every day from Tungkang to the small island, which boasts coral reefs and rich marine life.
    • The rest of the island is characterized by beautiful sandy beaches, coral reefs, warm clear blue waters and idyllic islands.
    • Ciguatera poison is made by a microscopic organism that attaches itself to algae growing in the warm waters of coral reefs.
    More example sentences
    • The pieces on this page - not to scale - are only the tip of the mountain of crystal, coral, bead, shell, pearl and sequin baubles available out there for summer.
    • The precious ingredients, ivory, coral, amber and crystal, have a distinctly magical aura - precious medicine for a precious child.
    • The sculptures are made of copper and silver decorated with coral, pearl, crystal and stone and are often set on a heart-shaped base.
    More example sentences
    • Remove the orange beak of coral from each scallop.
    • In a food processor, mix the lobster coral with three ounces of butter until well combined and reserve.
    • Separating the boys from the girls, females, called ‘hens’, are often preferred for their roe or coral.
    1.2 (color) (color (masculine)) coral (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • The key colours are bright coral, various shades of purple, peach and green.
    • Cyclamen flower petals range in colors from pink to white, coral, red, purple, and also a wide array of bicolors.
    • Jewel colours such as coral and emerald-green showed up often on runways last week, and shoppers should expect to see them in a few months in stores everywhere.

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el relevo de la guardia = the changing of the guard …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a ración is a serving of food eaten in a bar or cafe, generally with a drink. Friends or relatives meet in a bar or cafe, order a number of raciones, and share them. Raciones tend to be larger and more elaborate than tapas. They may be: Spanish omelet, squid, octopus, cheese, ham, or chorizo, among others.