Translation of cork in Spanish:

cork

Pronunciation: /kɔːrk; kɔːk/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (substance) corcho (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Made from the inner bark of the Mediterranean cork oak tree, cork can be cut repeatedly from trees that may be hundreds of years old.
    • There are other things you can do with cork: make cork tiles out of it, for example.
    • The bathroom is at the back of the hall: it has cork floor tiling, part-tiled walls and a chocolate brown suite, including a bath with telephone shower attachment and bidet.
    More example sentences
    • Root bases were attached to the stem over cavities prepared by removing lenticels and discs of cork and secondary cortex beneath.
    • Adaxial bulliform cells, cork cells and subsidiary cells were not silicified.
    • Suberin is also formed developmentally and is found in the dermal cells of underground tissues, the Casparian band and in the cork cells of bark tissue.
    1.2 countable/numerable (in bottle) corcho (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • The sounds of corks popping on champagne bottles added to locals cheering on the endeavours of the small committee who had over-seen a job well done.
    • Finally, someone popped the cork on a champagne bottle and we all cheered.
    • Pascal personally popped the corks of the champagne bottles, and by doing so, auspiciously symbolised the incoming of luck and good fortune for the Pattaya Blatt team.
    1.3 countable/numerable (in angling) corcho (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • They had fishing poles, and lines with corks on them out floating in the scummy water.
    • The cork floated on the surface, its quill upright like the periscope of a submarine.
    • A small cork or float usually is used to suspend the bait a foot or two beneath the surface (the distance can be adjusted by sliding the float).

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • [bottle] ponerle* un (tapón de) corcho a

Definition of cork in:

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a ración is a serving of food eaten in a bar or cafe, generally with a drink. Friends or relatives meet in a bar or cafe, order a number of raciones, and share them. Raciones tend to be larger and more elaborate than tapas. They may be: Spanish omelet, squid, octopus, cheese, ham, or chorizo, among others.