There are 2 translations of coronary in Spanish:

coronary1

Pronunciation: /ˈkɔːrəneri; ˈkɒrənri/

adj

  • [artery/vein] coronario coronary thrombosis trombosis (feminine) coronaria
    More example sentences
    • The cause of coronary heart disease is a narrowing of the arteries that supply the heart with blood.
    • The drug was most commonly prescribed to treat coronary artery disease and following coronary stent placement.
    • Tests show that he has severe coronary artery disease and needs coronary by-pass surgery.

Definition of coronary in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of coronary in Spanish:

coronary2

n (plural -ries)

  • infarto (m) (de miocardio), trombosis (f) coronaria I nearly had a coronary when she told me cuando me lo dijo casi me da un ataque or un infarto
    More example sentences
    • On a mass scale there never was a need for aspirin to prevent coronaries in people who had never had a heart attack.
    • Many had high blood pressure with the risk of coronaries and there were a lot of ulcers.
    • Nonetheless, the parents in the town were close to having coronaries and kept a close watch on their children, also enforcing an early curfew.

Definition of coronary in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.