There are 2 translations of crawl in Spanish:

crawl1

Pronunciation: /krɔːl/

vi

  • 1 1.1 (creep) arrastrarse; [baby] gatear, ir* a gatas; [insect] andar* I crawled to the phone and called for help me arrastré hasta el teléfono y pedí ayuda a spider crawled up my leg una araña se me subió por la pierna flesh 1 1
    More example sentences
    • I leaned forward, crawling on my knees to a bottle of beer resting on the desk next to the door.
    • Rolling across the ground, she crawled forward on her belly, ignoring the taste of grime and blood in her mouth.
    • Mack and I dove on the ground and began to crawl forward.
    More example sentences
    • The creature slowly crawled into the clearing and snuck over to Oki's side.
    • A pale green light shrouded the scenery, above a canopy thrived and animals and birds crawled and flew through the treetops.
    • The knight rode ahead of him calm and self-contained, but Kieran felt as though insects were crawling under the surface of his skin.
    1.2 (go slowly) [traffic/train] avanzar* muy lentamente, ir* a paso de tortuga [colloquial/familiar] time crawled by el tiempo pasaba muy lentamente
    More example sentences
    • He sat down beside her and looked at the constant stream of slow-moving vehicles crawling along to the junction with the street.
    • The streets of South London were unusually dark as our bus crawled through a rainy Clapham and Brixton.
    • When I looked out of the window, there were three or four blokes going from door-to-door whilst an unmarked transit van crawled along behind them.
  • 2 (teem) the beach was crawling with tourists la playa estaba llena or plagada de turistas, la playa hervía de turistas
  • 3 (demean oneself) [colloquial/familiar] arrastrarse, rebajarse to crawl to sb arrastrarse or rebajarse ante algn
    More example sentences
    • Bill's always crawling to management, hoping for promotion.
    • That's just what independent people who have worked hard all their lives want: to have to go crawling to the State with their begging bowl out.
    • Next thing you know, the t-shirt companies will come crawling to you, asking for you to be their ambassador!
    More example sentences
    • Inside it is crawling with maggot-like insects.
    • In the beginning, the area had been crawling with soldiers and bristling with guns.
    • You know the place is going to be crawling with all those people from the history department you don't like.

Definition of crawl in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.

There are 2 translations of crawl in Spanish:

crawl2

n

  • 1 (slow pace) (no plural/sin plural) to go at a crawl avanzar* muy lentamente, ir* a paso de tortuga [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • I was forced to slow down to a crawl and pay special attention to everything going on around me.
    • If every laptop user is downloading from the network at this speed, the servers will slow to a crawl.
    • He said the road did not look particularly dangerous but jams were caused when motorist slowed down to a crawl because of the icy conditions.
  • 2 (swimming stroke) crol (masculine) to do the crawl nadar crol or (Spain/España) a crol or (Mexico/México) de crol
    More example sentences
    • The crawl stroke, with flutter kick, had been introduced into competitive swimming a few years earlier by another Aussie.
    • The shoulder can be put into a precarious position during the recovery and entry periods of the crawl and butterfly strokes.
    • So popular was the gala that the number of events had to be restricted to the front crawl and the backstroke because such a large number of competitors turned up.

Definition of crawl in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.