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crick
American English: /krɪk/
British English: /krɪk/

Translation of crick in Spanish:

noun

  • I've got a crick in my neck
    me ha dado tortícolis
    Example sentences
    • Adam woke up quite early thanks to a painful crick in his neck.
    • His back was stiff, and his neck had a crick in it.
    • My backside was sore from sleeping on such hard ground and my neck had a crick in it from the high elevation of my ‘pillow’.

transitive verb

  • to crick one's neck
    hacer un mal movimiento con el cuello
    Example sentences
    • Bees winger Peter Sutcliffe missed that tie three weeks ago after cricking his neck at his hotel breakfast table on the day of the match.
    • Harold said he couldn't get down comfortably to play shots because he cricked his neck a few days ago.
    • Another lady claimed she had cricked her neck because she was ‘shocked’ by a movement made by one of the centre's ‘human statues’.

Definition of crick in:

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