Translation of critical in Spanish:

critical

Pronunciation: /ˈkrɪtɪkəl/

adj

  • 1 1.1 (censorious) [remark/report] crítico he watched us with a critical eye nos observó con ojo crítico to be critical of sth/sb criticar* algo/a algn she's terribly critical of government policy critica duramente la política del gobierno
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    • The report is also critical of road safety education because of its lack of prominence, vagueness and poor training for teachers.
    • Children with low self-esteem tend to be overly critical of and easily disappointed in themselves.
    • Inman is highly critical of industry sponsored safety studies, which he regards as marketing exercises.
    1.2 (journalistic, academic) [analysis/theory/writing] crítico the film enjoyed a critical success la película fue muy bien recibida por la crítica
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    • Set up a year ago by Martin Wheeler, 33, Iwari and its artists have sparked critical acclaim in the music press.
    • His recent CD recording of Liszt's piano music received critical acclaim.
    • It was released in July 2001 to critical acclaim.
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    • Translations of major texts are borrowed from current scholarly editions, while English texts are based on critical editions.
    • Since Q2 represents the text closest to the author's manuscript it might be chosen as the copy text for a critical edition.
    • Entire pages of these two critical texts are presented in her book, bilingual explanations on the left-hand side, graphic images on the right.
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    • Gavin sits on a Masters Degree Visual Arts Practises course with me where we have seen critical judgment voided by curatorial organisational skills.
    • The book is divided into two parts: a 35-page critical essay followed by drawings grouped according to theme.
    • The investigations, however, were not only celebratory; various critical examinations of the institution of cinema also emerged.
  • 2 2.1 (very serious) [condition/situation/shortage] crítico 2.2 (decisive, crucial) [period/phase] crítico; [victory/decision/resource] de importancia fundamental
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    • We have a potentially critical situation here.
    • It puts us in a difficult and critical situation.
    • None of these problems is critical, but they all act to inhibit the process of renewing Australia's economic infrastructure.
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    • But do they represent a critical factor in the success or failure of a business?
    • This gives them the right to take decisions of critical importance, having gained two thirds of the stake in the holding.
    • This completely fails to recognise the critical importance that success in business has in funding our aspirations for the public services.
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    • When the fraction is close to the critical value, computation times become very large.
    • On the other hand, if the frequency exceeded a certain critical value, there would be enough energy for the electron to be able to get away.
    • Similarly, superconductivity can be destroyed by applying a magnetic field that exceeds some critical value.
    2.3 [Physics/Física] [pressure/temperature/volume] crítico critical angle ángulo (masculine) crítico to go critical iniciar una reacción en cadena
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    • Following the accident, he was rushed to hospital in critical condition with a severe head injury and underwent brain surgery the very next day.
    • As of Wednesday afternoon at least two workers remained in critical condition from severe burns and six others were listed in serious condition.
    • It said nine of those injured were in critical condition, suggesting that the death toll might rise.

Definition of critical in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.