There are 2 translations of crochet in Spanish:

crochet1

Pronunciation: /krəʊˈʃeɪ; ˈkrəʊʃeɪ/

vt

  • [shawl/dress] tejer a crochet or a ganchillo
    More example sentences
    • When I pause in typing to think about the next sentence, I am crocheting a scarf that I promised to mail tomorrow.
    • She crocheted this scarf.
    • Queen Mary's Irish lace wedding dress was reputedly crocheted by three ladies from Foxpoint.

vi

  • hacer* crochet or ganchillo, tejer a crochet

Definition of crochet in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of crochet in Spanish:

crochet2

n

uncountable/no numerable
  • crochet (m), ganchillo (m); (before noun/delante del nombre) [cushion/shawl] tejido al crochet, de ganchillo crochet hook aguja (f) de crochet, ganchillo (m), crochet (m) (Chile)
    More example sentences
    • The Federation Shield for craft was won by Mrs. Breda Phelan, for her beautiful cotton crochet tablecloth.
    • Also on display are soft wood toys and dolls, puppets and lampshades in leather, ceramic and terracotta pottery, crochet laces, cotton durries, silver filigree and tribal embroidery.
    • Grown-up gypsy chic can be found in spades there, where chiffon skirts offer a dressier alternative to cotton, alongside good-quality crochet shrugs in turquoise and raspberry.

Definition of crochet in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.