Translation of cross section in Spanish:

cross section

Pronunciation: /ˈkrɔːsˈsekʃən; ˌkrɒsˈsekʃən/
, (British English/inglés británico) cross-section

noun/nombre

c and u
  • 1 [Biology/Biología] [Mech] sección (feminine), corte (masculine) transversal in cross section en sección, en corte transversal
    More example sentences
    • When the straw is straight, the cross section is a perfect circle.
    • In cross section it is a symmetrical structure of three blades protruding from a central, solid shaft.
    • In cross section, crystals have a compressed diamond-shaped outline.
    More example sentences
    • Partial wood cross sections were removed from each tree with a chainsaw and the location of each sample was then determined and placed on the topographic map.
    • Culture involves a hanging sheet of acrylic of an approximate pine-tree shape, on which are mounted 26 petri dishes, most containing thin cross sections of rolled canvas.
    • My old swimming goggles fit perfectly on the thin cross section of birch.
    More example sentences
    • Beyond the gas chamber was a detector, which allowed them to measure the cross section - the probability for benzene molecules to interact with gas atoms at each velocity.
    • True, we should not expect the biology teacher to teach the fluid dynamics of the circulatory system, or the chemistry teacher to teach the concept of cross sections when introducing nuclear chemistry.
    • The comments did, however, leave open the outside possibility that such an inordinate cross section might be due to some role of the atomic electrons in coupling the x-ray photons strongly to the nucleus.
  • 2 (representative sample) they took a cross section of society tomaron una muestra representativa de los distintos estratos sociales a cross section of opinion un amplio espectro de opinión

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.