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crystal

Pronunciation: /ˈkrɪstl/

Translation of crystal in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 countable/numerable [Chemistry/Química] cristal (masculine) bath crystals sales (feminine plural) de baño
    Example sentences
    • The pattern of diffracted rays and their intensity are determined from the arrangement of atoms and number of electrons on each atom in the crystal.
    • Scientists soon learned that they could use X-ray diffraction to learn how atoms and molecules were arranged in crystals.
    • Thus, the crystals have cleavage planes for the necessary migration aptitude.
  • 2 2.1 uncountable/no numerable crystal (glass) cristal (masculine) 2.2 countable/numerable (watch cover) cristal (masculine) or vidrio (masculine) ([ de reloj ]) mica (feminine) (Latin America/América Latina)
    Example sentences
    • The cornea is the clear part of the eye much like a watch crystal.
    • Sapphire crystal is the cover of choice for premium watches.
    • The only description I can equate is when the watch crystal catches a beam of sun and dances around the walls/ceilings.
    Example sentences
    • Lifting up his glass of water, and noting the way the pure crystal glass glinted in the harsh light, he took a small sip from it.
    • There are over 40 varieties made from clay, marble, granite, brass, panchaloka, aluminium, papier-mâché rosewood, sandalwood, crystal glass etc.
    • There will also be a show of local crafts including fretwork, crystal glass, embroidery, dancing costumes, placemats, potted plants, flowers, and taxidermy.

adjective/adjetivo

  • [literary/literario] (before noun/delante del nombre) [water/stream] cristalino

Definition of crystal in:

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Word of the day trocha
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.