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dawn

Pronunciation: /dɔːn/

Translation of dawn in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 u and c (daybreak) amanecer (masculine) as dawn breaks al rayar o romper el alba [literary/literario], al amanecer at dawn al amanecer, al alba [literary/literario] from dawn till dusk de sol a sol, de la mañana a la noche (before noun/delante del nombre) [patrol/start] de madrugada
    Example sentences
    • She pushed the horse faster, but didn't sit up until the first light of dawn rose over the horizon.
    • All observations of mating behavior commenced at the beginning of this dawn period.
    • She wakes up in those dawns and rises with the sun.
  • 2 countable/numerable (beginning) albores (masculine plural) [literary/literario], aurora (feminine) [literary/literario] since the dawn of civilization desde los albores de la civilización the dawn of hope el despertar de la esperanza
    Example sentences
    • Driving through a land which has been intensively farmed since the dawn of civilisation, we soon reached the Ghab, a rich agricultural valley which had once been marshland.
    • Humans require new dawns, fresh starts, ends of eras.
    • If we are correct, the Late Devonian wood problem was an almost inevitable result of evolutionary developments at the dawn of life.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

[literary/literario]

Phrasal verbs

dawn on

verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento
it dawned on me that … caí en la cuenta de que …, me cayó el veinte (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar] or (Chile) [colloquial/familiar] la chaucha de que …

Definition of dawn in:

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Word of the day trocha
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.