There are 2 translations of dead end in Spanish:

dead end

n

  • 1.1 (street) callejón (masculine) sin salida
    More example sentences
    • I drove down the road to an empty dead-end street with brush and overgrowth all over the place, not a building in sight.
    • Holly went to drop her bags off at her house, which was all the way at the end of our dead-end street, and I went up to my room.
    • Most Thorndon side roads are dead ends, narrower than varicose veins and have a topography that even a goat would baulk at.
    1.2 (situation) callejón (masculine) sin salida to come to o reach a dead end llegar* a un callejón sin salida or a un impasse
    More example sentences
    • This longing usually takes over when they feel constrained or trapped in a situation such as a dead-end job, an unhappy marriage, or have settled into a routine that hints of boredom.
    • Desperation is the key factor; each character wants to break out of their dead-end situation, but in the end they always opt to hold on.
    • Slacker Jeff (played with an enviable edge by Chris Fassbender) is slowly going mad in a dead-end job and can't be bothered to attend more than one class at a local community college.

Definition of dead end in:

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Word of the day madeja
f
hank …
Cultural fact of the day

The CAP (Curso de Adaptación Pedagógica) is a course taken in Spain by graduates with degrees in subjects other than education, who want to teach at secondary level. Students take a CAP in a particular subject, such as mathematics, literature, etc.

There are 2 translations of dead end in Spanish:

dead-end

Pronunciation: /ˈdedˈend/

adj

  • 1.1 (without exit) [street/road] sin salida, ciego (Andes, Venezuela) 1.2 (without prospects) [colloquial/familiar] a dead-end job un trabajo sin porvenir or futuro

Definition of dead end in:

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Word of the day madeja
f
hank …
Cultural fact of the day

The CAP (Curso de Adaptación Pedagógica) is a course taken in Spain by graduates with degrees in subjects other than education, who want to teach at secondary level. Students take a CAP in a particular subject, such as mathematics, literature, etc.