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death
American English: /dɛθ/
British English: /dɛθ/

Translation of death in Spanish:

noun

  • 1 uncountable and countable (end of life) to die a natural death he died a peaceful death
    tuvo una buena muerte or una muerte tranquila
    the fire caused several deaths
    el incendio causó varios muertos or cobró varias víctimas
    the illness can result in death
    la enfermedad puede ser mortal
    death by strangulation/drowning
    muerte por estrangulación/inmersión
    they were united in death [literary]
    la muerte los unió
    death to the traitor!
    ¡muerte al traidor!
    to put somebody to death
    ejecutar a alguien
    he was sentenced to death/to death by hanging
    lo condenaron a muerte/a morir en la horca
    he was stabbed/beaten to death
    lo mataron a puñaladas/golpes
    to freeze/starve to death
    morirse de frío/hambre
    to bleed to death
    morir desangrado
    he drank himself to death
    el alcohol acabó con él or lo mató
    to fight to the death
    luchar a muerte
    a duel to the death
    un duelo a muerte
    to death (as intensifier) [colloquial]to be scared to death
    estar muerto de miedo
    they're frightened to death of losing their jobs
    tienen un miedo espantoso de perder el trabajo
    I was bored to death
    me aburrí como una ostra [colloquial]
    I'm sick to death of your complaining
    estoy hasta la coronilla de tus quejas [colloquial]
    his mother spoiled him to death
    la madre lo echó a perder con tanto mimo or lo malcrió de mala manera
    I'm worried to death
    estoy preocupadísima
    as pale as death
    blanco como un papel
    you look as pale as death
    estás blanco como un papel
    at death's door
    a las puertas de la muerte
    to be the death of somebody
    acabar con alguien
    you'll be the death of your poor mother
    vas a acabar con tu pobre madre
    vas a matar a disgustos a tu pobre madre
    to catch one's death (of cold)
    agarrarse or (Spain) coger una pulmonía doble
    to do something to deaththat play has been done to death
    esa obra está muy trillada
    if they get hold of a good idea, they tend to do it to death
    si se les ocurre una buena idea, la repiten hasta la saciedad or hasta el cansancio
    Richard II was done to death in his prison cell [literary]
    a Ricardo II lo asesinaron or le dieron muerte en su celda
    to hang on like grim death
    aferrarse con todas sus fuerzas
    to look like (grim) death
    tener la cara desencajada
    you look like death warmed over o (British English) up [humorous]
    ¡tienes muy mala cara!
    Example sentences
    • It is a sad fact that these deaths are now so commonplace that they rarely make the news.
    • There is no family history of sudden infant deaths and everything had seemed okay.
    • It is estimated that around one fifth of all deaths in the UK are attributed to smoking.
  • 2 (end) that was the death of my hopes/ambitions
    eso acabó con mis esperanzas/ambiciones
    it's death to small businesses
    para los negocios pequeños es la ruina
    Example sentences
    • Cinema's birth or rebirth is intimately linked to its death and the process of its mourning.
    • The death of the American auto industry -- and the loss of hundreds of thousands of high-paying union jobs -- isn't necessarily a bad thing for the environment if it means more market share for more efficient Japanese vehicles.
    • The Mighty Ed Driscoll has a terrific post on the death of the smart romantic comedy, inspired by a piece by A.O. Scott.

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    Word of the day doofus
    Pronunciation: ˈduːfʌs
    noun
    a stupid person
    Cultural fact of the day

    onces

    In some Andean countries, particularly Chile, onces is a light meal eaten between five and six p.m., the equivalent of "afternoon tea" in Britain. In Colombia, on the other hand, onces is a light snack eaten between breakfast and lunch. It is also known as mediasnueves.