There are 2 translations of decimal in Spanish:

decimal1

Pronunciation: /ˈdesəməl; ˈdesɪməl/

adj

  • [number/fraction/notation] decimal; [currency/coinage] decimal accurate to three decimal places exacto hasta la tercera cifra decimal
    More example sentences
    • The advent of decimal arithmetic reduced the need for such tests.
    • The number system which was used to express this numerical information was based on the decimal system and was both additive and multiplicative in nature.
    • The discovery of the binomial theorem for integer exponents by al-Karaji was a major factor in the development of numerical analysis based on the decimal system.
    More example sentences
    • The uniformity of administrative structures was reflected, later, in the imposition of a national, decimal system of weights, measures, and currency.
    • Elaborated between 1790 and 1799, the decimal metric system of weights and measures was zealously promoted under Napoleon.
    • Even if your business cannot join the general changeover to decimal money for a while after Decimal Day - February 15-you still need to prepare now for the introduction of decimal currency.

Definition of decimal in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of decimal in Spanish:

decimal2

Definition of decimal in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.