Translation of defense mechanism in Spanish:

defense mechanism

, (British English/inglés británico) defence mechanism

noun/nombre

  • [Physiology/Fisiología] [Psychology/Psicología] mecanismo (masculine) de defensa
    More example sentences
    • It is equivocal whether or not fever can be universally regarded as a body defence mechanism, particularly as its usefulness or otherwise where there is no infection is obscure.
    • The neurological basis for the response to tickling probably evolved from a reflex defense mechanism that protected our body's surface from external, moving stimuli - most often, predators or parasites.
    • It is thought to be the body's natural defence mechanism - the body tries to reach a temperature that the virus or bacteria cannot survive in.
    More example sentences
    • The traumatised patient uses denial as an ego defence mechanism that operates unconsciously to resolve emotional conflict, and to allay anxiety by refusing to perceive the more unpleasant aspects of external reality.
    • In Freud's theories, repression was the fundamental defense mechanism, a way of keeping disturbing and anxiety-generating thoughts and memories out of consciousness.
    • Another common complication in hostage situations is a human defense mechanism called the Stockholm syndrome, in which hostages come to empathize with the captors and their cause.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.