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deficient

Pronunciation: /dɪˈfɪʃənt/

Translation of deficient in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • [formal] [nutrition/supply/vocabulary] deficiente, insuficiente he felt he was somehow deficient as a husband sentía que de alguna manera fallaba como marido he's mentally deficient [offensive/ofensivo] es (un) deficiente mental [anticuado u ofensivo] to be deficient in sth carecer* de algo foods deficient in vitamins alimentos (masculine plural) de bajo contenido vitamínico a plan deficient in imagination un plan carente de imaginación
    Example sentences
    • The rapidly growing yearling is further jeopardized when twice daily feedings are already marginal or deficient in protein quality.
    • The summer growing season of kenaf corresponds with low quality forages deficient in protein in the Southeast.
    • I told myself that my attitude, knowledge, and skill cost a patient's life and I was deficient in all those qualities that a doctor should have.
    Example sentences
    • The report accuses prosecutors of conducting deficient investigations or presenting inadequate evidence at the trials.
    • She blames deficient preparation and insufficient commitment on the part of the school, but she also notes impediments in the exams themselves.
    • Similarly, she has not observed or complained about any deficient workmanship in the insulation and drywall and she believes that none exists with respect to her residence.

Definition of deficient in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.