Translation of delve in Spanish:

delve

Pronunciation: /delv/

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1.1 (research) [literary/literario] to delve into sth ahondar en algo to delve into the past hurgar* en el pasado
    More example sentences
    • Along with that, the show has two researchers delving into all the newspaper periodicals that are sent in.
    • His research delves into matroidal structures, a concept based on graphs and matrices and its applications.
    • I was confused and delved into my own research on the matter.
    More example sentences
    • They rounded another corner, careful not to brush up against the slime-covered wall and descended down another tunnel, delving deeper underground.
    • Although the economy as a set of material practices has existed ever since ‘Adam delved and Eve span,’ it was not conceptualized as separate until about 300 years ago.
    • He turned the corner and still the tunnel delved deeper into the rock.
    1.2 (rummage) hurgar*, escarbar
    More example sentences
    • Jo then delved in to the toy box and brought out a farmyard set before passing round a bag of plastic animals for the youngsters to pull out and identify.
    • At great personal risk I delved in among the spines today but, apart from last year's abandoned nest, there was nothing.
    • Then he prised open my mouth and delved in with a metal stick while the nurse fed a miniature sprinkler system down my gullet.

Definition of delve in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.