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depreciate

Pronunciation: /dɪˈpriːʃieɪt/

Translation of depreciate in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 2 (disparage) [formal] [achievement/ability] menospreciar
    Example sentences
    • Ironically, many minorities also lead the efforts to abolish affirmative action under the belief that their educational achievements are depreciated, disparaged and seen as less valuable.
    • Written in diary form it is a humorous, self depreciating honest account of a woman faced with the realities of a breast cancer diagnosis.
    • They were different to the other bands, in that they had great catchy melodies and a nice line in self depreciating lyrics.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • [Finance] [assets/shares/currency] depreciarse
    Example sentences
    • The simple reason behind this change is that the US dollar and the euro are going to steeply depreciate against the value of gold.
    • There are pockets where values have depreciated.
    • Buying a cheaper car that depreciates rapidly is a false economy.
    Example sentences
    • Changes in accounting policies are another example of something to watch for - for example, a company might decide to depreciate assets over a longer period to save on the depreciation charge.
    • Furthermore, since computers can be depreciated over a five-year period, the company is also permitted to record the expense using its regular depreciation method.
    • Previously, equipment and business assets had to be depreciated over a five to seven year time span.

Definition of depreciate in:

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a school that is privately owned but receives a government grant is called a colegio concertado. Parents pay monthly fees, but not as much as in a colegio privado. Colegios concertados normally cover all stages of primary and secondary education and often have religious connections.