Translation of derivative in Spanish:

derivative

Pronunciation: /dɪˈrɪvətɪv/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 (unoriginal) [novel/painting] carente de originalidad; [plot/theme] manido, trillado; [artist/writer] adocenado
    More example sentences
    • Moreover, says the performer, that painful experience is what led Shakespeare to become more than a sharp-tongued wit, more than the derivative writers of his era and ours.
    • I suppose she is a cultural phenomenon that cannot be ignored, but I find her programme, and the derivative imitators to be deadly dull and no substitute for actual thought.
    • However, he is not a derivative imitator of classic Japanese cinema, but one of its original though sadly neglected film-makers.
  • 2 (derived) derivado
    More example sentences
    • I particularly remember a poem which was very derivative of English poetry called ‘Fugue’ by Neville Dawes, a Jamaican novelist and poet.
    • With gameplay more derivative of the Harlem Globetrotters than the NBA, players bust insane ankle-breaking moves to confuse and fake out opponents on their way to the hoop.
    • In 1913 he was overwhelmed by the European modernism exhibited at the Armory Show and his style entered an eclectic, derivative phase, influenced by Gauguin, Matisse, and van Gogh.
  • 3 [Finance] derivado
    More example sentences
    • It is possible to use unrealized gains in financial assets (including derivative contracts) as collateral for further purchases.
    • This is because they buy complex derivative products to mirror the performance of the underlying stock market index or indices which are not transparently priced.
    • Given recent developments in calculation and derivative products, new opportunities are now available in portfolio construction and trading.

noun/nombre

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, pinchos are small portions of food, often on a cocktail stick, eaten in a bar or cafe. Often free, they are similar to tapas, but much smaller. There are pinchos of many foods, including Spanish omelet, ham, sausage, and anchovy.