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derivative

Pronunciation: /dɪˈrɪvətɪv/

Translation of derivative in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 (unoriginal) [novel/painting] carente de originalidad; [plot/theme] manido, trillado; [artist/writer] adocenado
    Example sentences
    • Moreover, says the performer, that painful experience is what led Shakespeare to become more than a sharp-tongued wit, more than the derivative writers of his era and ours.
    • I suppose she is a cultural phenomenon that cannot be ignored, but I find her programme, and the derivative imitators to be deadly dull and no substitute for actual thought.
    • However, he is not a derivative imitator of classic Japanese cinema, but one of its original though sadly neglected film-makers.
  • 2 (derived) derivado
    Example sentences
    • I particularly remember a poem which was very derivative of English poetry called ‘Fugue’ by Neville Dawes, a Jamaican novelist and poet.
    • With gameplay more derivative of the Harlem Globetrotters than the NBA, players bust insane ankle-breaking moves to confuse and fake out opponents on their way to the hoop.
    • In 1913 he was overwhelmed by the European modernism exhibited at the Armory Show and his style entered an eclectic, derivative phase, influenced by Gauguin, Matisse, and van Gogh.
  • 3 [Finance] derivado
    Example sentences
    • It is possible to use unrealized gains in financial assets (including derivative contracts) as collateral for further purchases.
    • This is because they buy complex derivative products to mirror the performance of the underlying stock market index or indices which are not transparently priced.
    • Given recent developments in calculation and derivative products, new opportunities are now available in portfolio construction and trading.

noun/nombre

Definition of derivative in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.