Translation of designation in Spanish:

designation

Pronunciation: /ˌdezɪgˈneɪʃən/

n

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (naming) designación (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Other trees at Anderson Cottage will be considered for historic designation along with those nominated by communities across the country.
    • The precise parcels of land earmarked for designation were not publicly identified until May 1988.
    • But the lack of scientific knowledge about the area, as well as the ongoing regression of the habitats due to the current draining, makes any designation of the area most unlikely.
    1.2 countable/numerable (name) [formal] denominación (feminine) [formal], nombre (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • These process groups are shown by the Table, along with each process name and letter designations.
    • The Army had not been naming its fighters, just giving them designations.
    • The sites usually list bios and name some of the professional designations that qualified pros have.
  • 2 countable or uncountable/numerable o no numerable (appointment) nombramiento (masculine), designación (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • And I suspect that the box office return for the film will make that designation an even higher honor than it is today.
    • Another important provision of the new charter was that it eliminated party designation for candidates running for office.
    • The most famous such appointee was, of course, John, whose designation as chief justice was understood by one and all to be a powerful political statement.

Definition of designation in:

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Word of the day esporádicamente
adv
sporadically …
Cultural fact of the day

The PAN (Partido de Acción Nacional) is the political party that won the Mexican general elections in 2000, breaking the Partido Revolucional Institucional's record of 71 years in power. PRI - Partido Revolucionario InstitucionalPAN was founded in 1939 as a conservative alternative to President, Lázaro Cárdenas. It presents an image of being a defender of popular causes, but takes an individualistic approach to matters of education and property. Its traditional policies include limiting state intervention in the economy to a minimum and bringing about a greater rapprochement between the government and the church.