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desire

Pronunciation: /dɪˈzaɪr; dɪˈzaɪə(r)/

Translation of desire in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 countable/numerable (wish) deseo (masculine), anhelo (masculine) [literary/literario] his greatest o heart's desire su mayor deseo or [literary/literario] anhelo, su deseo ferviente a desire for sth deseos (masculine plural)de algoa desire to + infinitive/infinitivo he expressed a desire to see his family dijo que tenía deseos de ver a su familia, dijo que deseaba ver a su familia I have no real desire to go into business no me entusiasma la idea de dedicarme a los negocios
    Example sentences
    • Given the strong desires of those who wish to maintain the status quo, however, the plan faces an uphill battle before being adopted.
    • When film stars join politics out of strong commitment or a genuine desire to do public good, their credibility is intact.
    • The freedom to share yourself, that is, your passions, your fears, your secret desires, your wishes with others is one of the greatest treasures of mankind.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (lust) deseo (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • A strong sexual desire, it was contended, should be recognised as a sign of health and energy, both for the individual and for society.
    • When panderers to sexual desire frequent a location, other appetite providers will follow.
    • Fortunately, today there are lots of options for keeping a woman's sexual desire strong.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 1.1 (want) [happiness/success/approval] desear it is to be desired es de desear his conduct leaves a great deal to be desired su conducta deja mucho que desear 1.2
    (desired past participle of/participio pasado de)
    deseado to have the desired effect producir* el efecto deseado cut the wood to the desired length corte la madera a la medida deseada
    1.3 (request) [formal] rogar* [formal], solicitar [formal] to desire sb to + infinitive/infinitivo rogar(le)* a algn que + subjunctive/subjuntivo

Definition of desire in:

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Word of the day vedar
vt
to prohibit …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a school that is privately owned but receives a government grant is called a colegio concertado. Parents pay monthly fees, but not as much as in a colegio privado. Colegios concertados normally cover all stages of primary and secondary education and often have religious connections.