Translation of detachment in Spanish:

detachment

Pronunciation: /dɪˈtætʃmənt/

noun/nombre

  • 1 uncountable/no numerable (aloofness) distancia (feminine), indiferencia (feminine); (objectivity) objetividad (feminine), imparcialidad (feminine) he watched the execution of the prisoners with detachment presenció impasible la ejecución de los prisioneros
    More example sentences
    • I wish I could approach this with the cool detachment that I view the new series of Enterprise, or the next episode of Desperate Housewives.
    • The intellectual's obligation to detachment and objectivity is never lost sight of.
    • While watching ‘The Passion’ I felt a sense of detachment even as I was being emotionally pummeled by the images on the screen.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (act of detaching) [formal] desprendimiento (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Retinal detachment (separation of the retina from the pigment epithelium behind it) is a rarer cause of blindness.
    • A second form of retinal detachment may develop when new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina.
    • The implications of this idea extend beyond vascular disease to other matrix remodeling and detachment processes such as cancer.
  • 3 countable/numerable [Military/Militar] destacamento (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • The four Kidd-class destroyers will become the flag ships of separate detachments of the task force,’ he said.
    • U.S. Central Command sent a detachment of the Army's 3rd Infantry Division to control the facility's gate.
    • The Japanese garrison, which included two infantry battalions and naval detachments, resisted tenaciously and the islands were not declared secure until 18 May.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.