Share this entry

Share this page

devalue

Pronunciation: /diːˈvæljuː/

Translation of devalue in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 [Finance] [currency] devaluar*
    Example sentences
    • In March 1995 the Spanish and Portuguese currencies were devalued by 7 and 3 per cent, respectively.
    • Inflation, which is always politically engineered, devalues currencies, debases trust and takes years to work its way out of investors' perceptions.
    • Analysts argue, for example, that China, widely considered to have played a constructive role in helping East Asia recover from the last crisis, did so by sticking to its market reform efforts and not devaluing its currency.
    1.2 [person/work] subvalorar
    Example sentences
    • One aspect of the problem is that playing Bangladesh regularly is inflating the statistics of players from other teams who play them a lot, and devaluing the importance of test matches.
    • But it has a downside: one of them would lose, and Warren would have to decide whether it is worth devaluing one of his commodities to advance the other.
    • By using knowledge in an instrumental way, it devalues its importance.

Definition of devalue in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day botella
f
bottle …
Cultural fact of the day

The name of Spain's state-run post office is correos. Stamps can be bought in an estanco, although certified or express mail must be sent from a post office (estafeta or oficina de correos). Postboxes in Spain are silver with red and yellow hoops. There are also red boxes for urgent mail. In Latin America correo, in the singular, means both a post office and the mail system.