Translation of diffuse in Spanish:

diffuse

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

/dɪˈfjuːz/
  • [heat/particle] difundir, esparcir*; [light] tamizar*, difuminar [knowledge/news] [formal], difundir
    More example sentences
    • During such movement, oil molecules diffused into the cytoplasm of both palisade and spongy cells.
    • The interior of channel-forming membrane proteins contains a column of water molecules through which protons and other small ions can diffuse across the membrane.
    • Unfortunately, the majority of cancer deaths are due to metastases from malignant cells that have stealthily diffused into adjacent tissues and into organs far from the primary.
    More example sentences
    • The fourth side is screened by lightweight wattle wall that gently diffuses the harsh light.
    • It's refreshing these days to be reminded how good film can be when film-makers don't plane every rough edge and diffuse each harsh ray of sun, like make-over artists gone berserk.
    • Upstairs, etched glass light wells diffuse luminance into the restaurant and glazed screens enclose private rooms.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

/dɪˈfjuːz/
  • [heat/wave] difundirse, esparcirse*; [news/customs] [formal], difundirse
    More example sentences
    • It works efficiently to create and diffuse purchasing power throughout the economy and disseminate liquidity throughout the financial system.
    • It has diffused a wider lack of confidence on the part of investors and consumers, accentuating the trend towards recession.
    • But slowly, in the course of time the proletarian agenda of the communist parties is also diffusing rapidly.

adjective/adjetivo

/dɪˈfjuːs/
  • 1.1 [Physics/Física] [light/gas] difuso 1.2 [speaker/writer/style] difuso, poco preciso

Definition of diffuse in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.