Translation of dismal in Spanish:

dismal

Pronunciation: /ˈdɪzməl/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (gloomy) [place/tone] sombrío, deprimente, lúgubre; [person] taciturno, triste
    More example sentences
    • And mine is the world of the rented room, where damp creeps in in the dismal gloom and music is the only thing I own.
    • As glorious Tramore yet again defied the dismal weather forecasts the fans flocked to the seaside venue.
    • One idea is pushing election day back into October, to spare voters going to the polls in dismal weather.
    More example sentences
    • Her reassuring smile did little to reassure her dismal friends.
    • After the past 10 days in the spotlight, internal morale for the 200 STB staff is dismal.
    • If these really are the views of those around him, one fears he must run with a rather dismal crowd.
    1.2 (very bad) [news/prophecy] funesto; [future] muy negro; [weather] malísimo; [results/performance/conditions] pésimo her attempts resulted in dismal failure sus intentos fracasaron estrepitosamente
    More example sentences
    • The play is a history of his romantic failures, with amorous adventures ranging from the comic to the pitiful but always dismal failures.
    • This self-centredness bothered some of his followers, who quit after the party's dismal electoral performance.
    • By that measure, too, Australia's recent performance looks dismal.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.