Translation of disqualify in Spanish:

disqualify

Pronunciation: /dɪsˈkwɑːləfaɪ; dɪsˈkwɒlɪfaɪ/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo (-fies, -fying, -fied)

  • 1.1 (debar) [Sport/Deporte] descalificar*to disqualify sb (from sth) the team was disqualified from the contest el equipo quedó descalificado de la prueba she was disqualified from taking the exam fue inhabilitada para presentarse al examen
    More example sentences
    • A military appointing authority could choose to disqualify any panel member for good cause.
    • A court can disqualify directors for between two and 15 years for unfit conduct.
    • His words were not considered serious enough to refer to a national Administration Panel, which has the power to disqualify councillors from office for a fixed period of up to five years.
    More example sentences
    • I don't see how either of those aspects would technically disqualify me from an unwanted job at a pet store, so I had some hope left.
    • The human element disqualifies science from the equation, and the bottom line is, the only thing that is certain is that nothing is certain.
    • If you want narrow dogma, how about the plight of a major political party in which being pro-life disqualifies you from seeking national office because special interests forbid it?
    1.2 (make ineligible) as a professional she was disqualified from entering the Olympics el hecho de ser profesional le impedía participar en las Olimpíadas a criminal record disqualifies you from jury service tener antecedentes penales inhabilita or hace no apto para ser miembro de un jurado

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.