Translation of distort in Spanish:

distort

Pronunciation: /dɪˈstɔːrt; dɪˈstɔːt/

vt

  • 1.1 (deform) [metal/object] deformar his face was distorted by o with anger/pain tenía el rostro crispado por la ira/del dolor
    More example sentences
    • The shadows warped and distorted as a humanoid shape detached itself.
    • It was gnarled like a tree branch, twisting and distorting in places.
    • It twisted in sickening slow motion, distorting out of shape.
    1.2 [Optics/Óptica] [image/reflection] deformar, distorsionar a distorting mirror un espejo deformante
    More example sentences
    • Her face was distorted with agony, and small squeaks erupted from her mouth.
    • Their faces were distorted with fear and anguish.
    • His face was distorted with tension, sweat dripping from his temples to the tiny cheap pin on his shirt: manager.
    1.3 [Electronics/Electrónica] [signal/sound] distorsionar
    More example sentences
    • Heat made the air thick - it must be distorting the sound waves, slowing them down.
    • These air pockets can distort the sound waves and produce an unclear image.
    • She screams at him until the volume of her voice is distorting the phone signal and he cannot comprehend a word she says.
    1.4 (misrepresent) [facts/statement] tergiversar, distorsionar
    More example sentences
    • Many investors now distrust pension accounting because it distorts reported earnings.
    • In addition, the probability of the results being distorted by confounding factors has not been adequately addressed.
    • The nature of adulation does not distort his impression of reality.

vi

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.