Translation of domesticated in Spanish:

domesticated

Pronunciation: /dəˈmestɪkeɪtəd; dəˈmestɪkeɪtɪd/

adj

  • 1 [Bot] [Zool] [animal/species] domesticado; [plant] aclimatado
    More example sentences
    • Sheep are thought to be the first domesticated livestock.
    • In general, the faunal remains seem to suggest increasing use of domesticated animals over time.
    • Surely, a puppy is neither tame nor domesticated.
    More example sentences
    • Thus, the Himalayas can be considered a region of domesticated barley diversification.
    • These changes were sufficient to add the bean to the list of domesticated plants.
    • These highly domesticated blossoms carry overtones of the convivial rituals of patrician social life.
  • 2 (of person) (pred) [humorístico/humorous] she's not very domesticated no es una mujer muy de su casa he's thoroughly domesticated now ahora está totalmente domesticado [humorístico/humorous]
    More example sentences
    • In fact, you in the UK are the most domesticated people on earth.
    • True, Harvey is allowed to be a bit flirty, but essentially Harvey is presented as a very domesticated Mary.
    • You combine dual aspects by being ambitious professionally and domesticated in the home and family situations.

Definition of domesticated in:

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