Translation of dominant in Spanish:

dominant

Pronunciation: /ˈdɑːmənənt; ˈdɒmɪnənt/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 1.1 (more powerful) [nation/party/force/influence] dominante dominant market position posición (feminine) dominante en el mercado
    More example sentences
    • He argues that historically the reaction of lesser states has been determined more by the potential power of the dominant state than by its actual behaviour or avowed intentions.
    • Geopolitics, history and common sense all indicate that a dominant power chooses its own policies without being influenced by the special wishes of others - however friendly.
    • His powerful and sometimes dominant influence on Austrian politics is a result of the refusal of the other official parties to seriously take him on.
    1.2 (predominant) [crop/industry] predominante, preponderante; [pattern/topic] dominante, preponderante
  • 2 [Biology/Biología] [Ecology/Ecología] [Music/Música] dominante
    More example sentences
    • Fluctuations in the productivity of dominant plant species should also have a significant impact on complex food webs in forest ecosystems.
    • In an environment with moving sand, tolerance to partial burial seems to be a requisite for the dominant plant species.
    • Perennial woody plants are the dominant species in many ecosystems of the world and have significant ecological and economic importance.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.