There are 2 translations of drip in Spanish:

drip1

Pronunciation: /drɪp/

vi (-pp-)

  • 1.1 (fall in drops) water was dripping from the ceiling el techo goteaba, caían gotas del techo blood was dripping from his nose le salía sangre de la nariz beads of sweat were dripping from her brow le caían gotas de sudor 1.2 (let drops fall) [washing/hair] chorrear, gotear; [faucet/tap] gotear hang it up and let it drip cuélgalo y deja que (se) escurra I'm dripping with sweat estoy chorreando de sudor
    More example sentences
    • When I got back to the car after doing my private business I noticed that the liquid had stopped dripping.
    • His eyes were closed, jaw dropped, and his face dripping with soup.
    • She had a look that spoke for nobody to come by and her entire outfit was dripping with some sort of liquid substance.
    1.3 (display lavishly)to drip with sth to drip with charm/venom rezumar encanto/veneno to drip with medals/diamonds ir* cargado de medallas/brillantes
    More example sentences
    • The teacher's voice wasn't dripping with sarcasm or spite; in fact, the teacher had the best intentions at heart when he had said that aloud.
    • My voice was dripping with sarcasm, however he didn't seem to notice.
    • Her voice was dripping with not only sarcasm but something so much more lethal.

vt (-pp-)

  • the wound was dripping blood salía sangre de la herida you're dripping coffee down your shirt te estás manchando la camisa de café, te estás chorreando la camisa con el café (Latin America/América Latina)

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.

There are 2 translations of drip in Spanish:

drip2

n

  • 1 1.1 (sound, flow of rainwater, tap) (no plural/sin plural) goteo (masculine) the steady drip, drip of the rain el continuo gotear de la lluvia
    More example sentences
    • Ayden listen and there was an annoying drip, drip, drip sound that echoed throughout the basement for what seemed forever.
    • The drip, drip dripping sound of water echoed eerily, tensing her nerves.
    • Everywhere sounded the drip of icewater, rubbing away at banded marble and rough limestone.
    1.2 countable/numerable (drop of liquid) gota (feminine) place a tray under the roast to catch any drips ponga una bandeja debajo del asado para recoger el jugo/la grasa que pueda caer
    More example sentences
    • To make cleanup easier next time, line shelves and bins with small plastic trays or a double thickness of paper towels to catch drips.
    • Don't forget a tray or saucer underneath to catch the drips.
    • Its cleverness is in the way the handle is angled to suit the curves of a lavatory bowl, while the top of the holder is slightly dished to catch drips.
  • 2 [Medicine/Medicina] suero (m), gota a gota (m) he's on a drip le han puesto suero or el gota a gota
    More example sentences
    • By the time my husband arrived 10 minutes later, he was already on oxygen, a fluid drip and intravenous antibiotics.
    • He was taken to hospital for blood tests and given a course of antibiotics through a drip.
    • It means ‘artificial nutrition and hydration’ - otherwise known as feeding through a tube, or hydrating through a drip in the arm.
  • 3 (ineffectual person) [colloquial/familiar] soso, (masculine, feminine) [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • I probably sound a bit of a drip, but I feel I'm in this permanent hallucinogenic state.
    • He's a bore, he's a drip, he's a sneak.
    • He's a drip, but he's very faithful, you know.

Definition of drip in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.