There are 2 translations of drip-dry in Spanish:

drip-dry1

Pronunciation: /ˈdrɪpdraɪ/

adj

  • [fabric/garment] de lava y pon, de lavar y poner, lavilisto® (River Plate area/Río de la Plata) drip-dry no retorcer
    More example sentences
    • All eight pairs of underpants, four shirts, four string vests and three drip-dry slacks were burned to ash.
    • It's enough to make you head off, sobbing, to buy a pair of Marks & Spencer stay-pressed slacks in easy-care drip-dry nylon.
    • ‘Our bodies are drip-dry,’ says Wendy Bumgardner, Portland, Ore.-based marathon coach and about.com walking columnist.

Definition of drip-dry in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of drip-dry in Spanish:

drip-dry2

vi (-dries, -drying, -dried)

  • hang it out to drip-dry cuélguelo mojado y déjelo escurrir
    More example sentences
    • Hang one or two racks in a mud room or laundry room, and let shoes and garments drip-dry.
    • Apart from anything else, I wore the latter in the Jacuzzi this afternoon and it's still drip-drying in my shower.
    • In no time, he had the whole outfit draped over the shower curtain rod to drip-dry.

Definition of drip-dry in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.