There are 2 translations of duck in Spanish:

duck1

Pronunciation: /dʌk/

n

  • 1 1.1 countable/numerable pato (m); (female) pata (f) a dead duck un asunto acabado to play ducks and drakes hacer* cabrillas or (Southern Cone, Mexico/Cono Sur, México) patitos or (Colombia) pan y quesito (en el agua) to play ducks and drakes with sth tirar algo por la ventana to take to sth like a duck to water he took to skiing like a duck to water empezó a esquiar como si lo hubiera hecho toda la vida water1 1
    More example sentences
    • The other day while walking along the footpath opposite the park I noticed seven or eight drakes surrounding a female duck and her ten ducklings.
    • The female shows the same silhouette but is a brown duck whose crest is often obscured.
    1.2 uncountable/no numerable [Cookery/Cocina] pato (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • From a nutritional perspective, the duck, cucumber, spring onion and pancakes make a reasonably well-balanced meal.
    • In a heavy, flameproof casserole, cook the sausages and duck in the olive oil until their fat runs and the sausages and duck are golden on all sides.
    • Cook the duck until tender, then add the potatoes and onion.
  • 3 3.1 uncountable/no numerable (fabric) lona (feminine) 3.2
    (ducks plural)
    [Clothing/Indumentaria] pantalones (masculine plural) de dril or lona
    More example sentences
    • If stripes aren't your style, experiment with other casual fabrics, such as cotton duck, denim, and corduroy.
    • Cut the diaper cover pieces from the yellow cotton duck or broadcloth according to the pattern guidesheet.
    • I am interested in dyeing 35 yards of cotton duck for slipcovers for a sofa.
  • 4 countable/numerable (in cricket) cero (masculine) to be out for a duck ser* eliminado sin marcar ningún tanto

Definition of duck in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.

There are 2 translations of duck in Spanish:

duck2

vi

  • (bow down) agacharse; (hide) esconderse I ducked behind a pillar me escondí rápidamente detrás de una columna

vt

  • 1 (lower) [head] agachar, bajar
    More example sentences
    • Droplets of rain had already fallen, and he quickly ducked into his car to avoid being drenched by the rain.
    • He quickly ducked into the building and ran for the nearest lift.
    • Avoiding the rain he ducked into a nearby building and fled downstairs to take a covered shortcut to his work area.
  • 2 (submerge) hundir
    More example sentences
    • It is no more a proper trial than ducking witches used to be.
    • Offenders could be ducked in water.
    • Players, including William, were ducked under the water and roughly tackled by the opposing side.
  • 3 (dodge) [question] eludir, esquivar; [responsibility] evadir, eludir
    More example sentences
    • Cyrus ducked the blow and landed another punch to James' stomach, knocking the wind from him and sending him to the ground again.
    • He ducked the blow and countered it, his own fist connecting with my jaw and his knee finding its way to my stomach.
    • But he ducked the blow and darted his head back up colliding with Kung's chin.
    More example sentences
    • Whatever else that is, it's hardly ducking responsibility.
    • Is the closure of Internet chat rooms more about ducking responsibility than child safety?
    • And none of this is meant to suggest that the editorial page editor can use the policy to duck responsibility for inaccuracies on the page.

Phrasal verbs

duck out

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
escabullirse* to duck out of sth escabullirse* de algo, eludir algo

Definition of duck in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.