Translation of efface in Spanish:

efface

Pronunciation: /ɪˈfeɪs/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • [formal] borrar to efface sth from sth borrar algo de algo
    More example sentences
    • Is the carnage associated with them a result of lurid scriptural interpretations of religion which have effaced the life of the spirit?
    • To subordinate the essentially cinematic as he does is itself a technique of ineffable skill; and to efface his signature as a director from the style of a film argues a modest purity of aim that is refreshing.
    • Only by grossly simplifying and distorting the data, particularly in the domain of literary and textual production, can such differences be effaced or ignored between the cultures in the Republic and Northern Ireland.
    More example sentences
    • The unification of the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic was driven by the impulse to efface the memory of East Germany and the political, cultural and economic experience of East Germans.
    More example sentences
    • As author, she effaces herself absolutely in order to reflect and depict the story of Narcissus.
    • She had effaced herself when he first knew her; she had made herself small, pretending there was less of her than there really was.
    • The Talmud states that people's prayers are not accepted unless they efface themselves before God.

reflexive verb/verbo reflexivo

  • to efface oneself [formal] tratar de pasar inadvertido

Definition of efface in:

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Word of the day bártulos
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gear …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, pinchos are small portions of food, often on a cocktail stick, eaten in a bar or cafe. Often free, they are similar to tapas, but much smaller. There are pinchos of many foods, including Spanish omelet, ham, sausage, and anchovy.