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efface

Pronunciation: /ɪˈfeɪs/

Translation of efface in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • [formal] borrar to efface sth from sth borrar algo de algo
    Example sentences
    • Is the carnage associated with them a result of lurid scriptural interpretations of religion which have effaced the life of the spirit?
    • To subordinate the essentially cinematic as he does is itself a technique of ineffable skill; and to efface his signature as a director from the style of a film argues a modest purity of aim that is refreshing.
    • Only by grossly simplifying and distorting the data, particularly in the domain of literary and textual production, can such differences be effaced or ignored between the cultures in the Republic and Northern Ireland.
    Example sentences
    • The unification of the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic was driven by the impulse to efface the memory of East Germany and the political, cultural and economic experience of East Germans.
    Example sentences
    • As author, she effaces herself absolutely in order to reflect and depict the story of Narcissus.
    • She had effaced herself when he first knew her; she had made herself small, pretending there was less of her than there really was.
    • The Talmud states that people's prayers are not accepted unless they efface themselves before God.

reflexive verb/verbo reflexivo

  • to efface oneself [formal] tratar de pasar inadvertido

Definition of efface in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.