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effigy
American English: /ˈɛfɪdʒi/
British English: /ˈɛfɪdʒi/

Translation of effigy in Spanish:

noun plural -gies

  • (statue)
    Example sentences
    • The exhibition includes more than 300 objects including tapestries. jewellery, stained glass, tomb effigies and sculptures, as well as paintings and illuminated books.
    • The counterpart of the English and Scottish passion for painted portraits was an almost equal obsession with sculpted effigies on tombs.
    • My naive idea of a sculptor is someone who works with clay or other materials, or chisels away at a piece of stone to create figures, busts and statues, likenesses and effigies, that only they, with their huge talent, can create.
    Example sentences
    • The protesters also burned an effigy of the House of Representatives Speaker.
    • The protestors burnt effigies representing the demons of inflation and privatisation.
    • One young graphic designer from Ennis had come to the protest with a life-size effigy of the prime minister.

Definition of effigy in:

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    ESO (Educación Secundaria Obligatoria) is one of the stages of secondary education established in Spain by the LOE - Ley Orgánica de Educación (2006). It begins at twelve years of age and ends at sixteen, the age at which compulsory education ends. The old division between a technical and an academic education is not as marked in ESO, as all secondary pupils receive basic professional training.