Translation of egress in Spanish:

egress

Pronunciation: /ˈiːgres/

noun/nombre

  • 1 (way out) [formal] salida (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Access and egress for rear passengers is considerably easier because of the five-door layout - the car can easily carry four adults (or two adults and three children) and a boot full of luggage.
    • ‘We would stress the importance of gritting all A and B roads to facilitate the smooth and safe access and egress for the emergency services,’ he said.
    • Special care is being taken to ensure reserved seating remains available only to those who booked or bought such tickets and new gates installed at the Grand Stand are being depended upon to help increase control of access and egress.
    More example sentences
    • Instead of focusing motion detection only on entrances and egresses, such as doors and air ducts, it's most practical to simply flood the room with motion detection.
    • Finally, they emerged in a lab, several squads of armed men in paramilitary uniforms looking around stupidly from where they were covering the air ducts, elevator, stairs, and all other egresses.
    • Doorways into the mind and the unknown are symbolized as arcane, bewildering entrances and egresses.
  • 2 [Astronomy/Astronomía] egresión (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Ingress and egress are the terms usually employed for the phases when Mercury or Venus are entering and leaving, respectively, the solar disk.
    • To the chagrin of astronomers, the atmospheres of Earth and Venus conspired to make the exact timing of ingress and egress nearly impossible, often leaving an uncertainty of nearly half a minute.
    • He recorded the times of ingress and egress, but his observations, made from the deck of a rolling ship, were practically useless.

Definition of egress in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.