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emanate

Pronunciation: /ˈeməneɪt/

Translation of emanate in Spanish:

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • to emanate from sth [gas/light/sound] emanar de algo [ideas/suggestions] provenir* or proceder de algo
    Example sentences
    • You use very distinct and textured musical scores that seem to emanate from the actual source.
    • The advantage of this approach is that the entire wave field emanating from a seismic source can be considered.
    • A portrait bust of George Gershwin is shown on a pedestal, and dance music emanates from an unseen source.
    Example sentences
    • The concept of world-woman or world spirit emanates from a humble origin - the roots of African American culture that value community and interpersonal relations as measures of success.
    • What if I said they all happened to have originally emanated from the Land Down Under?
    • We are aware that the earth and the moon emanated from their original star, the sun.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • [charm/hostility] emanar
    Example sentences
    • Gord Downie is one of the few songwriters whose lyrics still emanate the qualities of poetry and Downie's literary allusions are many.
    • After a while, she stood up and walked toward the woman, her face emanating an intense feeling of sorrow yet of anger as well.
    • From these and Harms's other works, there emanates a feeling of exuberance, self-deprecating humor and cheerful absurdity.

Definition of emanate in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales