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enormity

Pronunciation: /ɪˈnɔːrməti; ɪˈnɔːməti/

Translation of enormity in Spanish:

noun/nombre (plural -ties)

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (wickedness) enormidad (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • The full enormity of the tragedy has now emerged, and large sums of money have been pledged.
    • This because the horror, the scale, the quantitative enormity and ‘serial’ nature of the crimes had exceeded any individual legal responsibility.
    • Even as the full enormity of the attack continued to sink in, Nato and the UN Security Council were falling in behind the US line.
    1.2 countable/numerable (crime) atrocidad (feminine), barbaridad (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • There is no doubt that the person to be tried committed criminal enormities.
    • Such bloodstained enormities pass unnoticed now in a media pummelled into numbness by a government at last bereft of any moral sense or shame.
    • Before the human and financial enormities of that conflict, leaders and citizens assumed that wars were what countries did.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (great size) enormidad (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • The Government has not grasped the full enormity of what is happening to this industry.
    • With the multi-million euro shopping centre at its Shandon location now in full swing the enormity of its benefit to the overall economy of the town can hardly be overstated.
    • At this stage I have not had the opportunity to review the draft plan at the Council chambers so do not know the full enormity of the plan.

Definition of enormity in:

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Word of the day cal
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Cultural fact of the day

Sherry is produced in an area of chalky soil known as albariza lying between the towns of Puerto de Santa María, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and Jerez de la Frontera in Cádiz province. It is from Jerez that sherry takes its English name. Sherries, made from grape varieties including Palomino and Pedro Ximénez, are drunk worldwide as an aperitif, and in Spain as an accompaniment to tapas. The styles of jerez vary from the pale fino and manzanilla to the darker aromatic oloroso and amontillado.