Translation of enormity in Spanish:

enormity

Pronunciation: /ɪˈnɔːrməti; ɪˈnɔːməti/

noun/nombre (plural -ties)

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (wickedness) enormidad (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • The full enormity of the tragedy has now emerged, and large sums of money have been pledged.
    • This because the horror, the scale, the quantitative enormity and ‘serial’ nature of the crimes had exceeded any individual legal responsibility.
    • Even as the full enormity of the attack continued to sink in, Nato and the UN Security Council were falling in behind the US line.
    1.2 countable/numerable (crime) atrocidad (feminine), barbaridad (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • There is no doubt that the person to be tried committed criminal enormities.
    • Such bloodstained enormities pass unnoticed now in a media pummelled into numbness by a government at last bereft of any moral sense or shame.
    • Before the human and financial enormities of that conflict, leaders and citizens assumed that wars were what countries did.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (great size) enormidad (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • The Government has not grasped the full enormity of what is happening to this industry.
    • With the multi-million euro shopping centre at its Shandon location now in full swing the enormity of its benefit to the overall economy of the town can hardly be overstated.
    • At this stage I have not had the opportunity to review the draft plan at the Council chambers so do not know the full enormity of the plan.

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Cultural fact of the day

Guernica is a Basque town destroyed by German bombers fighting on the Nationalist side in the Spanish Civil War in April 1937. Guerra Civil. The world was shocked at the slaughter of civilians. Guernica (Gernika) is the site of the ancient Basque parliament and of the oak tree, the árbol de Guernica, beneath which Spanish kings traditionally swore to uphold Basque privileges or fueros. Pablo Picasso commemorated the destruction of Guernica in his painting of the same name.