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ensign

Pronunciation: /ˈensaɪn; ˈensn/

Translation of ensign in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 2 (officer) 2.1 (in US navy) alférez (masculine and feminine) 2.2 (in UK army) [History/Historia] abanderado (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • The colours marched off the parade, an illustration where historically they would have been lodged for safe keeping in the colour ensign's quarters for the night and the evening watch mounted.
    Example sentences
    • Just to make things complicated, their ensign - the lowest commissioned rank in the British army - was a lieutenant-general, one of the highest in the world of real soldiers.
    • The poems were never published, but they circulated widely and, as one officer said at the time, ‘there was scarcely a more or less literate ensign in the army who did not know them by heart.’
    • The young ensign is sailing home from India in 1805 when his ship is seized by a French warship and he ends up off Cadiz, Spain.
    Example sentences
    • All Sailors will be given a clear career roadmap, outlining how they progress from seaman to master chief, or from ensign to admiral.
    • Think about a fairly new petty officer or ensign dealing with a new system.
    • ROTC is an elective course of study, taken in conjunction with any academic major that, upon graduation, leads to a reserve commission as a second lieutenant in the army, air force, or Marine Corps or an ensign in the navy.

Definition of ensign in:

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