Translation of equity in Spanish:

equity

Pronunciation: /ˈekwəti/

noun/nombre

  • 1 uncountable/no numerable (fairness) [formal] equidad (feminine) [formal]
    More example sentences
    • It was based on principles of equity, people-centredness, quality and accountability.
    • Where are the health strategy principles of quality, equity, and accessibility?
    • The focus here has rarely been on equity or on a fair deal for the poor.
  • 2 [Business/Comercio] [Finance] 2.1 uncountable/no numerable (shareholders' interest in company) patrimonio (masculine) neto (before noun/delante del nombre) equity capital capital (masculine) propio 2.2 uncountable/no numerable (residual worth) participación (feminine) en el capital
    More example sentences
    • The equity in the properties appears to be in the region of £9 million.
    • While living in his house, he refinanced it repeatedly, pulling out equity to buy other properties.
    • As a result, the ratio of mortgage debt to home equity is at near-record highs.
    2.3
    (equities plural)
    (shares) valores (masculine plural) de renta variable (before noun/delante del nombre) the equities market el mercado de valores
    More example sentences
    • They can now invest in a complete range of assets from property to equities and bonds.
    • Many investors act primarily as consumers of equities rather than as shared proprietors.
    • Today, the herd talks of giving up on equities just when stocks have never been cheaper.
    More example sentences
    • The board of IDBI Bank will meet on May 19 to consider a rights issue of its equity shares.
    • They align incentives around enterprise-level outcomes such as market share and return on equity.
    • Like all convertible bonds, CoCos can be swapped for equity if the share price reaches a certain target.
  • 3
    (Equity)
    (in UK)[ sindicato de actores ]

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.